Monday, October 15, 2012

Winsor McCay and Google

Google search engine is epic today!!! They have recreated the adventures of Little Nemo in Slumberland for the 107th anniversary of Winsor McCay's comic strip's first publication.

Regarded as a comic-strip art masterpiece, the weekly strip first appeared on October 15, 1905 in the New York Herald as Little Nemo in Slumberland and later in New York American as In the Land of Wonderful Dreams.

The interactive and animated Google doodle celebrating the nightly dreams of the little boy called Nemo begins with Nemo dreaming about falling from his bed into a hole and being rescued by Princess Camille. After a series of little adventures, through Google-land (the interactive doodle strip is titled Little Nemo in Google Land) Nemo, as in the actual comic strip, falls out of his bed. In the different panels of the Winsor McCay Little Nemo Google doodle the letters of the Google logo - G-O-O-G-L-E - appear in a chronological order.



Winsor McCay was not only a newspaper cartoonist, but also a pioneer of animated films. He started off as a poster and hoardings artist and later moved to newspaper cartooning.

Friday, October 5, 2012

Claire Carpenter

I went to see Claire Carpenters 3rd Solo show at the Cross Gallery last night, the work was beautiful...i'm a fan, it is on till the 27th of October.



There is a shifting blend of fantasy and recollection in Claire Carpenters predominately small scale tempera on gesso paintings. Using passages of loose rhythmical brushwork Carpenter conjures up a dream-like and intimate atmosphere and then weaves it together with intricate narrative details. This complex relationship between the remembered and real, abstracted and representational creates an uneasy balance and tension within the frame, as if each brush stroke hides a dark secret.






Meticulously rendered depictions of animals, human figures, shells and landscape details seem to loosely refer to the artists own memories and ask questions about how we see, how we know and how we remember. However this hidden personal narrative, is full of contradictions and is open to interpretation as we are never given enough information to be conclusive about what she is trying to say, forcing us to surrender and open up to what is before us.